Are You Really What You Eat?

There is an old popular adage that states, “You are what you eat,” implying that in order to be fit and healthy you need to eat good food. While this notion is certainly true, it is complicated by our modern food supply. It is no longer enough to eat a balanced diet full of whole grains, lean meats, and fresh fruits and vegetables and expect to have adequate nutrition. Data collected by the US government shows that there has been a decline in the nutritional content of our fruits and vegetables. The USDA has proven that store-bought fruits and vegetables have far less vitamins, minerals, and nutrients than they did 40-50 years ago. One study shows we would have to eat 8 oranges today to get the same amount of vitamin A our grandparents would have gotten from one orange!
The past five decades have been known as the “Green Revolution” which is demonstrated by the increased production and yield of the fastest growing and greatest producing plants. The decline of the nutrients in our crops is due to soil depletion during this mass agricultural phenomenon. The soil that most of our crops is grown on is so deficient in mineral content that our produce contains only about 10% of the vitamins and minerals they should have! Our soil quality has decreased because of the modern intensive agricultural methods that are used to improve size, growth and pest resistance.
Most plants require nitrogen, phosphorus and water in order to grow. However, if they are grown in soil without other nutrients present, the plants will be devoid of any nutrition, even though they will look good to the naked eye. The absence of nutrients in the soil creates plants that are less able to defend themselves against natural predators, and thus they require pesticides in order to protect themselves from damage. These chemicals sprayed on our fruits and vegetables are poisonous and have not been properly tested to determine their effects on humans.
Even though fruits and vegetables are not as healthy as they used to be, we should not avoid eating them. They still have beneficial nutrients, fiber, and phytochemicals, and they are much healthier than processed foods and other snacks. Buying organic and local fruits and vegetables helps preserve the nutrient content in our produce and helps us avoid damaging chemicals and pesticides.
So, continue to eat the rainbow of foods in front of you, but also realize that it might not be enough. You may need to replace the missing vitamins and minerals in your diet with nutritional supplements. A good multivitamin might go a long way in helping to ensure optimal health and nutrition and to make sure that you are, in fact, what you eat.

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